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Mastodon says "What's on your mind?" But the problem is that so much is always on my mind that I have no idea where to start, quickly get overwhelmed, and then say nothing at all.

"Infrastructure is very important for free software, and it's unfortunate that so much free software development currently relies on sites that don't publish their source code, and require or encourage the use of proprietary software." fsf.org/blogs/sysadmin/coming-

@cwebber I mentioned to you privately some time ago that I was working on a self-hosting Scheme compiling to JS that I didn't think I'd have time to ever get back to. Your message reminded me that I should probably just publish it and move on to other things. So here it is. Please forgive me for the atrocities. It can bootstrap either using a web browser or via Node.

mikegerwitz.com/projects/ulamb

Install Privacy Badger to protect your browsing from spying ads and invisible trackers. eff.org/privacybadger

I'm sorry to say that I've decided to cancel my plans to attend this year. My wife has had a rough pregnancy so far and will be just about in her final month during the conference, on top of having to care for our other two children solo for the weekend, and I don't want to put her in that position.

I hope to see everyone next year, and I'm sorry again to those I was going to meet up with.

mh- 

@zwol You asked if others received the same message from others channels. My answer is yes: every GNU Maintainer received the message. Alfred forwarded it to some of the public GNU lists as well.

Your message also seemed to question the legitimacy of the message. I said it was legitimate.

@zwol Yes, the message was authored by rms and sent to GNU maintainers.

@cwebber This message was sent because certain people decided to send mass mail subverting GNU's communication procedures, in such a way (whether it was intentional or not) that seemed like it was sent by GNU. It was forwarded to gnu-misc-discuss because people were told, in the message sent to maintainers by those people, to reply there.

I encourage you to look at my message <87ftfy25gu.fsf@gnu.org> on one of our internal lists for why I'm so disappointed by this.

BREAKING: We’ve confirmed that the Ring doorbell app on Android covertly shares personally identifiable information on its users with third-party companies, including Facebook.

eff.org/deeplinks/2020/01/ring

@cwebber Imposter syndrome can be really tough to deal with, but your second paragraph indicates that you're on the right track, and it's motivating to read.

Unfortunately I can't attach raw positive feelings to this toot, but pretend that I did. :)

@ocdtrekkie @sir The GNU ethical repository criteria exist to determine what hosts are acceptable for GNU packages. I was one of the original evaluators (but I haven't had time to evaluate since). rms helped develop the criteria, but did not perform any evaluations himself. GitHub was evaluated because it is popular, not just to give it an F.

We've needed evaluators willing to also update the webpages for years. Please get in touch at repo-criteria-discuss@gnu.org if interested.

@cwebber I haven't yet had the chance to give Terminal Phase the attention it deserves, but ideas like this are especially appealing to me. Playing the game could feel like hacking, depending on how far you take it.

I have a particular interest in text-based games based on automata. I designed a game where nearly all logic could be reprogrammed at runtime by playing the ASCII picture language as if it were a level. Too many yaks were shaved there and I never had time to implement it.

The biggest threat to our privacy online is third-party trackers’ slow, steady, relentless accumulation of relatively mundane data points about how we live our lives. eff.org/wp/behind-the-one-way-

@zladuric @codesections @alexbuzzbee The 5% (or whatever was configured) is reserved exclusively for root, so even though there's technically space left, it's not accessible to the logged in user.

If you log in as root, then bash completion will work.

Looking back on 2019, one thing I'm happy to see is that concerns are becoming much more mainstream.

When I gave a talk at LP2017 just three years ago, I began by saying "this is not a tinfoil hat presentation". If I were to give that talk today, I could confidently omit that line, because 2019 has created a far more fucked up narrative than I ever could have.

(On the downside, I haven't been able to keep up with the deluge of privacy related issues over the past year.)

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Mike Gerwitz's Mastodon Instance

Mike Gerwitz's personal Mastodon instance